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Will the Upcoming Synod be “Amazonian” or “Masonic”?

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The secretive role of the “tucum ring” sect in its preparation

After Belgian journalists, Jürgen Mettepenningen and Karim Schelkens revealed, in their biography of Belgian Cardinal Godfried Daneels, the existence of the “Sankt Gallen mafia” – which contributed greatly to the election of Pope Francis – ordinary Catholics became aware of the strength of pressure groups even within the Church.

However, historians and analysts have long known the weight of lobbies in ecclesial life. For example, shortly after the close of the Second Vatican Council, people learned about the role played by IDO-C[1] (International Center of Information and Documentation concerning the Conciliar Church) in the Council to create the “council of journalists” and the “council of communications media, which was almost a separate council,” as Benedict XVI said in his last speech on the eve of his resignation becoming effective.

The role played by the group of Conciliar Fathers operating under the denomination “Church of the Poor” has recently come to light. Its participants signed a secret “Pact of the Catacombs”[2] which Pope Bergoglio implemented on a universal level.[3]

The former papal Nuncio in Washington, Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, created a stir by denouncing the existence of a mutually supportive homosexual network that guarantees its members a good ecclesiastical career (and cover if they are involved in scandals).

To be effective, these pressure groups with personal or ideological interests must act in concert but do so in the shadows, mimicking the ways of Freemasonry with its mysterious signs of mutual recognition between brothers who do not belong to the same lodge.

The passage in which Marcel Proust draws a parallel between the behavior of the “brothers” and that of homosexuals of his time, of whom he spoke knowingly, is well known: “[They] form a far more extensive, effective and less suspect Freemasonry than that of lodges because it is based on an identity of tastes, needs, habits, dangers, learning, knowledge, traffic, glossary, in which the very members not seeking to know each other immediately recognize each other by natural or conventional signs.”[4]

The impact which the group of prelates and missionaries committed to Indigenous Theology, the most up-to-date version of Liberation Theology, who adopted the so-called “tucum ring” as a conventional sign of recognition will have on the coming Amazon Synod will certainly become known in the future.

Tucumã is the name of an Amazon palm tree of which the wood is used to make a black ring supposedly worn by blacks at the time of the Brazilian Empire in the absence of their masters’ gold ring. It is said to have served as a symbol of a marriage covenant, friendship or resistance. “It was a clandestine symbol whose language only they knew,” says the blog of the Youth Pastoral of the Diocese of Piracicaba.

In the 1970s, two agencies of the National Conference of Bishops of Brazil, the Indian Missionary Council (CIMI) and the Pastoral Land Commission (CPT), adopted and publicized the tucum ring as a symbol of their activists’ engagement in class struggle and in so-called “social causes”.

Tucum

Apparently, it was Dom Pedro Casaldáliga, a Catalan Cordimarian religious made bishop of São Félix do Araguaia in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso by Pope Paul VI and a driving force of CIMI and CPT, who popularized this symbol. Another prominent representative of Liberation Theology, Archbishop Tomás Balduino, Bishop Emeritus of Goiás Velho and for many years President of CIMI reports:

“Pedro was consecrated bishop in 1971 in the city of São Felix, surrounded by the poor people of that region. He received the liturgical symbols that were inculturated in the cultures of indigenous and peasant peoples. The mitre was a straw hat, the staff a tapirape oar, and the ring was made of tucum, becoming, on his finger and those of many pastoral agents, a sign of his commitment to the journey of liberation.”[5]

tucum 2

With undeniable poetic skills, the prelate thus summarized the meaning of this “journey”
in this poem: “With a callus for ring, / monsignor cut rice. / Monsignor “hammer and sickle”? / They will call me subversive. / And I will tell you: I am. / For I live for my struggling people. / I go marching with my people. / I have the faith of a guerrilla / and the love of revolution. ”

The tucum ring began to identify the personality and revolutionary agenda of the bishop of São Félix do Araguaia in such a way that one of the master’s theses about him, sustained by Agnaldo Divino Gonzaga before the theology department of the Catholic University of Góias, is precisely titled, “Tucum Ring: The Evangelizing Mission of Pedro Casaldáliga.”

An even more expressive proof of the relevance that the Liberation Theology current gives the tucum ring is a report by the newspaper Alvorada, an ‘awareness raising’ mouthpiece of the Prelature of Sao Felix, about the ceremony in which Bishop Pedro Casaldáliga transferred the diocesan government to his successor, Bishop Leonardo Steiner:

“Peter, on handing Leonardo the tucum ring, recalled that the causes we defend define who we are and that the causes of this Church are known to all: the option for the poor, defense of indigenous peoples, commitment to farmers and the landless, formation of inculturated and participatory communities, effective living of solidarity.”[6]

Tucum3A poem published on the Facebook page of the Basic Ecclesial Communities of Brazil, addressing the ring of tucum, says: “Of the excluded from peoples / You are the mark of the new covenant”.

In 1994, the movie “The Tucum Ring” was released. It is a fictional account  of a group of farmers who infiltrate a journalist in the Basic Ecclesial Communities to try to prove their communist and subversive character, but he “converts” to their cause. In the culminating scene — that of his conversion — the journalist-researcher has this dialogue with Bishop Casaldáliga (who plays himself in the movie):

“A curiosity, Dom Pedro: What does this black ring mean?

Tucum4

“- It’s a tucum ring, made from a palm tree of the Amazon. By the way, with some prickly thorns. It is a sign of the alliance with the indigenous cause, with popular causes. Who wears this ring usually means he has assumed these causes and their consequences. Would you wear a ring? Deal?

“Deal.”

“Look, this puts you on the spot, you know? It burns. Many, many were even killed for this cause, this commitment. We ourselves, here in the Church of São Felix of Araguaia, have a shrine to the martyrs of the journey.”[7]

Journalist Edoardo Salles de Lima asked the same question to the aforementioned bishop Tomás Balduino in 2012 on the eve of his 90th birthday. He replied:

“This is marriage to the indigenous cause. This piece was made by the Tapirapé Indians, and you can see how beautiful it is, it even shines. And we assumed it as a link with the indigenous cause but not only with this cause, with all the cause for change and transformation with the people in search of the Brazil that we want.”[8]

The tucum ring’s “identifying” function for the public, but above all in the eyes of others committed to Liberation Theology, was stressed by the late Italian Combonian missionary Father João Pedro Baresi, to the magazine Brasil de Fato:

“- What does the tucum ring in your hand mean? – It is the option for the poor. … It is the fidelity to this option. And why do I carry with me? To make it public that I am this. The tucum ring is solidarity with the poor. … When I see this ring on someone, I know he has an equal vision, an equal commitment.”[9]

Many years ago the late Bishop Amaury Castanho, when he was Bishop Emeritus of Jundiaí, reported about the noxious use of the tucum ring by Liberation Theology activists in the pages of the Testemunho da Fé, the official paper of the Archdiocese of Rio de Janeiro.

He begins his article by pointing out that “there have always been and will always be more or less severe tensions within the Church” and that after the Second Vatican Council “a terrible storm struck the bark of Peter,” one of whose effects was that “Marxist-cut Liberation Theology took up radicalized, rebellious, ideologized and partisan positions.”

Tucum6But shortly afterwards he attacked the sign of mutual recognition of its promoters: “Today, the curious tucum ring, made from the pit of a north-eastern palm tree, is the sign of contestation within the Church; one of those signs, and perhaps the most serious. It is on the fingers of a good number of priests and seminarians, man and women religious and lay people. If it is true that some wear it unawares — there will always be “useful innocents” even in the Church — it is no less true that the majority wear it as an in-your-face statement of their clear choice for an ecclesiology that is certainly not the ecclesiology of ‘Lumem Gentium’, of the Second Vatican Council.

“The tucum ring implicitly and explicitly involves unorthodox options for a church regarded as a popular church as opposed to a hierarchical Church, the only one instituted by Christ. It expresses a debatable and already condemned ‘exclusionary and exclusive’ option for the poor, marginalizing those who are not as oppressors. From a Marxist and biased analysis of reality, those who carry the tucum ring do not hesitate to propose revolutionary solutions, class struggles, guerrilla warfare, violence and terrorism, which has nothing evangelical and Christian. …

Leonardo Boff

“It is division within the Church of Christ, weakening it, distancing the sheep from the shepherds, putting bishops in opposition to the Pope, bishops against other bishops, priests and laity against bishops…

“Meanwhile, the enemies of the Church have fun, cheer and congratulate each other. That’s what they want: a Church that is not a community of love, uniting the faithful to Christ and to each other, the faithful with their pastors.”[10]

In his next article, Bishop Castanho accused them of sectarianism:

“The article about the tucum ring, which I wrote a few days ago, has caused a stir. Better, it has raised a controversy. Many liked it and thought that it was time for someone to get to the bottom of the problem by revealing the most accurate and entire meaning of wearing this ring. Some felt some discomfort as they wore it thinking it was only a sign of their option for the poor. They ended up taking it off their fingers! They wanted to live in full communion with the pastors of the Church, which is hierarchical by the will of Christ. I was applauded, reproached and questioned several times about the tucum ring.

“In conversations with a certain priest who had already worn it, I gave him more clarifying information. Among other things, I told him that I am not alone in my interpretation. Years ago, I read a book by a zealous and smart bishop from Maranhão [Brazil], of which an entire chapter drew the same conclusions: the tucum ring is a visible link between those who, in addition to their ‘option for the poor’, also advocate a ‘popular’ Church.”[11]

 

Bispo de Chapecó

One can say that the tucum ring, as a visible sign of union to a revolutionary current that plays the role of fifth column in the Church, works in a way analogous to the identifying signs of Freemasonry.

It remains to be seen how many participants of the next Synod will be wearing it … Then we will know whether the Special Assembly was “Amazonian” … or “Masonic”!

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2 thoughts on “Will the Upcoming Synod be “Amazonian” or “Masonic”?

  1. Modernist, Masonic, Marixist=Communist-every form of heresy invented and every ideology of hatred of the one, true God and His one, true Catholic Church-has been part and parcel of the counterfeit church born in Vatican II. The Amazon Synod is simply a natural progression of the hatred of Christ and of the Truth which these people have. Their plans, their agenda is simply becoming more obvious to some with their extreme-hater, Jorge Bergoglio, at the helm.

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