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From Liberation Theology to Ecofeminist Theology: A Revolution Encroached in the Church (IX)

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Introduction

The recent fires in the Amazon have brought to the fore the issue of using natural resources versus adopting a tribal, supposedly uncontaminated, and environmentally friendly way of life.

As we will see, the current debate has been taking place for a long time, and the promoters of tribalism are taking advantage of an entirely natural phenomenon, such as fires in dry weather, to cause a psychosis that justifies degrowth.

Let’s go to the text.

“World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth”

Aiming to set a global milestone at the launch of his ecological indigenist ideology, in April 2010 President Evo Morales of Bolivia convened a world meeting in the city of Cochabamba. While prescribing indigenism as a solution to all problems, he called into question free initiative and the market economy and praised an economy of indigenous survival and the rights of “Mother Earth.”

As could be expected, the Conference began with an enormous indigenist paraphernalia. “An ancestral ceremony (waj´ta, en aymara) with the participation of Andean amautas (shamans) and representatives of indigenous peoples from the world’s continents opened this Tuesday the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth, bringing together more than 20,000 delegates from 136 countries at the rural village of Tiquipaya, in the heart of Bolivia.”

“With the hoot of pututus (wind instrument made from bullhorn), quenas and zampoñas, typical instruments of the Andes, traditional offerings, and multicultural and multicolored clothes, the amautas asked “Father Cosmos”and “Mother Earth” for permission to advocate consensual positions in defense of nature and humanity.”[1]

From Santiago, the journalist Carlos Martínez reports that participants in this indigenous summit include “our Bishop of Aysén, Monsignor Infanti;[2] Marxist theologian Leonardo Boff; Sandinista leader Father D’Escoto, and the philosopher Noam Chomsky. Numerous organizations from Chile, some of which Mapuche, and the Manuel Rodríguez Patriotic Front, are among the sponsors.” The journalist also recalls statements of President Morales regarding the recent earthquake in Chile: “its causes were the anger of Mother Earth over the free economy system that destroys the environment . . . ‘earthquakes are consequences of neoliberal policies.’”[3]

Curious poster announcing ‘rights of the earth’: a plant with a clenched fist, symbol of socialism, and a dove, demanding ‘a world referendum against capitalism.” Is this a defense of the planet or a new way of pushing communism?

Comment: Judging by the subject and the organizers, this is an attempt to relaunch communism with costumes of indigenism and Mother Earth… and the inevitable collaboration of ecclesiastical “fellow travelers.”

Establishing the cult of Mother Earth was the only thing missing in the final declaration of the Cochabamba Conference. That will be done by “the native peoples.” However, two things were clear enough: Man is neither the apex of Creation nor called to “subdue” it, as stated in Genesis. Private property is the main culprit for damages to Mother Earth.

For an attentive reader, the conclusions of the mega event are simple: it is necessary to put an end to the traditional Catholic religion, which gives doctrinal support to the depredation of the Earth and to eliminate private initiative. Of itself, the list of Chilean entities present is telltale of where their conclusions lead.[4]

Human Rights: an expression that discriminates against other living beings?

Human Rights constituted the fundamental principles on which the United Nations Organization was established in 1948. At that time, it was about protecting a system that all member nations recognized as fair, and the organizers had found none better.

Without delving into the merit of this choice, here we want to show that ecofeminists consider this concept of Human Rights, a guiding principle of the world order, as anthropocentric and therefore discriminatory of the other living beings of the planet.

Father D’Escoto, in his visit to Chile after the Cochabamba Summit, stated to the Chilean leftist magazine Punto Final: “… When the United Nations was created, our worldview was wrong. We believed that human beings were outsiders who came from who knows where and were placed on Earth. Now we know it was not so. Now we understand that our Mother Earth thinks, invents, dreams, cries, laughs, loves, and venerates the Creator through you and me because we are Earth; that implies a whole new ethic, a new way to interrelate, to serve and to love Mother Earth.” The “worldview was wrong” because it placed human beings “on Earth.” That is why they gave Human Rights so much importance.

Answering a question by Punto Final on how to remedy this erroneous “worldview,” the priest states: “What is that proposal to reinvent the UN? Is it a profound reform and a new Charter of principles, or is it institutional change? It is about incorporating a new Universal Declaration of the Common Good, Mother Earth, and Humanity. This new declaration complements, without replacing it, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948. … On the other hand, the great crimes being committed must be seen as crimes against Mother Earth. That is why this new Charter proposes the Climate Justice Court.”[5]

Fr. Miguel D’Escoto Brockmann (1933-2017), was a Maryknoll priest. Between 1979 and 1990 he was the foreign minister of Sandinista Nicaragua, which earned him a strong conflict with the Vatican.

Comment: The expression ‘Human Rights’ is still tolerated. However, it must be complemented with this new Charter of Mother Earth and Humanity, which posits that humanity is subject to Mother Earth and should not subject it as Genesis teaches. Subjecting it would be establishing an unfair superiority of men over other living beings. A “Court of Climate Justice” must be set up to prevent “crimes” against Mother Earth. It is a kind of new-fangled French Revolutionary Tribunal that will prosecute and condemn all private initiative.[6]

It is important to know the background of this doctrine because the ideas of Fr. D’Escoto will be presented once again at the upcoming Amazon Synod.

In our next article, we will discuss “Mother Earth.”

  • [1] Cf. ABI – Rubén Sandi, Tiquipaya, Bolivia, April 20, 2010, http://cmpcc.org/2010/04/20/con-una-ceremonia-ancestral-de-agradecimiento-a-la-madre-tierra-arranca-conferencia-mundial-de-los-pueblos-en-bolivia/). 
  • [2] For reasons unknown to us, the Bishop of Aysén, Most Rev. Infanti, was not present at the Conference. His diocese was represented by Comisión Agua Vida, Vicariato Apostólico de Aysén.
  • [3] Cf. La Segunda, April 7, 2010.
  • [4] Here are a few national organizations that joined the Cochabamba Conference. Many of them sent representatives who were among the 350 Chileans present:
  • “Agrupación de Familiares de Detenidos Desaparecidos. Amerindia. Andha Chile a Luchar-Democrático. … Asociación Nacional de Mujeres Rurales e Indígenas, ANAMURI. ATTAC. Brigada Salvador Allende, BRISA. Canal de Televisión Comunitaria Víctor Jara TV. Caravana Ahimsa por la Tierra. … Central Unitaria de Trabajadores, CUT. … Centro Ecuménico Diego de Medellín. …Coalición Ecuménica Cuidado Creación. Coalición no a la privatización de nuestro mar. Comando Amplio de Solidaridad con Cuba. Comité Bolivariano de Solidaridad con Venezuela. … Comité de Defensa del Cobre. Comisión Agua Vida, Vicariato Apostólico de Aysén. … Conferencia de Religiosos y Religiosas de Chile, CONFERRE. … Corporación de Memoria y Lucha Popular. Edición chilena de Le Monde Diplomatique. Federación de Estudiantes de la Universidad de Chile, FECH. Generación 80. Grupo de Trabajo por los Derechos Colectivos Mapuche (Temuco). … Justicia y Paz, JUPIC. Juventud Socialista de Arica – Parinacota. Movimiento por la Asamblea del Pueblo. Movimiento social en defensa del agua, del medio ambiente y de los recursos naturales. Movimiento Surda. P.O.R. Trotskista-Posadista. Partido Comunista. Partido de Izquierda. Partido Igualdad. … Polo Izquierdo de la Memoria. Portal Rodriguista. Red de Acción por la Justicia Ambiental y Social …” Cf. http://rumboacochabamba.wordpress.com/). This list serves as a guide for someone wishing to know the connections between the ecofeminist religious movement and the Chilean Left.
  • [5] Cf. Punto Final, Nº 709, May 14, 2010.
  • [6]  It is interesting to note that, according to this current’s ideologues, feminism comes from the French Revolution: “The birth of feminism as a collective phenomenon took place in the wake of the French Revolution of 1789. This revolution, together with the other revolutions of a liberal-bourgeois type, set as its main objective achieving legal equality, as well as freedoms and political rights. However, despite the fact that women acted as a driving force behind the French Revolution of 1789 it was necessary to wait until 1791, when the playwright and revolutionary activist, Olimpia de Gouges published the “Declaration the Rights of Women of the Citizeness to counter the “Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen,” approved by the National Assembly in 1789. The latter was contradictorily based on excluding women from it even though it is recognized even today recognized as the essential political text par excellence” Cf. “El Feminismo frente a los retos del siglo XXI: El Ecofeminismo,” Verónica Álvarez Alarcón (CV) Universitat de les Illes Balears, España – http://www.eumed.net/rev/cccss/04/vaa.htm.
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