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Environmental Madness (XXII)

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Chapter VII

With UN Support, Radical Environmentalism Marches On

When the United Nations was founded shortly after World War II, it began as an international body intended to harmonize relations among nations and to prevent new wars. Over time, other purposes were emerged. Its bureaucratic apparatus, infiltrated by the Left, started to act in order to impose a totalitarian world government that would influence humanity to oppose and even persecute Christian civilization. Today, the UN uses the environmentalist agenda for the same purpose. First, it began by announcing a need to preserve nature for the good of humanity. Then, it continued its revolutionary march until the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, commonly called the Earth Summit or Rio 92, where its objective of metamorphosed communism emerged, as we will see below.

1. Rio92: Reassuring Appearance, Disturbing Reality

Eco-92

At first glance, Rio 92 had a fully justifiable purpose. Officially, it was convoked because scientists had come to the conclusion that the Earth is seriously threatened because mankind dominates it in a brutal, unscientific, and predatory fashion. Therefore, it was necessary for governments to act jointly and prepare legislation to regulate the way in which men could continue to use the Earth. It was a matter of life or death.

At the time, Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira denounced it: “The suspicion arises that ecology is nothing but metamorphosed communism. Morph means form, and meta indicates transformation. It would be, therefore, a transformation of communism. By placing man at the service of something inferior to himself, the Revolution contradicts the whole order that God established in Creation. To those who claim that ‘communism is dead,’ the answer is: ‘Here you have communism transformed.’ And it should be clarified that ecologist egalitarianism achieves the fullness of the egalitarian dream of communism.” [1]

Plinio Correa de Oliveira
Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

2. The Environment Becomes an International Issue

While concern for the environment has a long history, the matter became an international issue beginning in the 1960s.  The first general discussion of the subject took place in 1972 at a United Nations Summit in Stockholm. Afterwards,, in a crescendo, the UN held a series of meetings and studies through the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the Environment Programme of the United Nations (UNEP), and the World Commission on Environment and Development (UNCED).

In 1974, after a meeting held by UNCTAD and UNEP, the UN published the Cocoyok Declaration, which laid out different hypotheses about the environmental problem. In 1975 the Dag Hammarskjold Report was published. A project of the Dag Hammarskjold Foundation, it  had the participation of researchers and politicians from 48 countries with a contribution by UNEP and another 13 UN organizations. In July 1986, UNEP and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) established the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as a UN-dependent agency. The Brundtland Report (Our Common Future) published in 1987 as a result of the work of UNCED, dealt with sustainability as a development strategy.

In 1990, 1995, 2001, and 2007 the IPCC published extensive reports on climate change, its causes, and its consequences on flora and fauna. Together with these reports were summaries for policymakers (SPM) which included several recommendations on environmental policy measures aimed at government officials, and have served as the basis for international agreements promoted by the UN.

In 1992, a second global UN meeting on the environment known as Rio 92  was held in Rio de Janeiro. It gave rise to several documents: the Earth Charter; three conventions on biodiversity, desertification and climate change; Declaration of Principles on Forests; the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development; and the so-called Agenda 21.

As a follow up to this agenda, in 1997 the UN organized a Rio+5 meeting at its headquarters in New York and a similar gathering, the Johannesburg Rio+10 Summit in 2002. Among the UN’s environment-related actions, we should include the Kyoto Protocol, the international treaty negotiated in Japan in 1997.

In conjunction with these initiatives, some institutions such as universities, research centers and NGOs have participated in discussions about the preservation of the environment, and the Club of Rome has issued several widely disseminated publications on the subject.

In Brazil, the stream of news reports on environmental problems had a deep effect. The issue gained prominence from the second half of the 1960s, and in the subsequent decades, the state incorporated it into public policy. The environmental issue is explicitly addressed in Brazil’s current Constitution, written and promulgated in 1988.[2]

In 1992, Brazil hosted in Rio de Janeiro the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development or Rio 92. Since then, Brazil has actively participated in various other UN initiatives and has ratified documents and other resolutions produced at these events.

As a signatory of the Convention on Biological Diversity, for example, Brazil has established protected areas that constitute the National System of Conservation Units, which aim to preserve representative portions of five major areas of Brazilian ecosystems: rainforest, savannah, scrub, wetland and Atlantic forest. Over the years, the country has established a legal framework on the environment, consisting of laws and decrees, instructions, regulations, ordinances, resolutions and norms of various degrees.[3]

Greatly simplifying the issue, we can classify the environmental preservation problems into two categories according to their number and geographical breadth. First, the preservation problems on the local level, i.e. within a municipality, city or locality, addressing issues such as air pollution, solid or liquid industrial waste without proper treatment. Second, the problems that affect a state, country and even the whole world such as global warming, deterioration of biodiversity, depletion of non-renewable natural resources, etc.

This last category is precisely where environmentalist abuses comes in. As explained earlier, we should heed the warning of Professor Molion in his interview with Catolicismo in which he insists that one must “use Clean Development Mechanisms (CDM), i.e. human activities that reduce air, water and soil pollution [note that he says pollution and not CO2] and reforestation of degraded areas. These measures are always welcome and should be supported. But it is important not to confuse environmental conservation with climate change. We need to conserve the environment whether it warms or cools.”[4]

 

[1] Cf. “Eco 92: Aparência e Realidade Profunda,” Catolicismo, No. 501, September 1992.

[2] See the Constitution’s provisions on the environmental issue in Annex III at the end of this book.

[3] See, in Annex IV, a summary of the main Brazilian laws on the environment.

[4] Cf. “Eco 92: Aparência e Realidade Profunda,” Catolicismo, No. 501, September 1992.

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