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The Synod of Great Ruptures

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The “new civilization,” dreamed up by the organizers of the Amazon Synod, rejects the city, preferring the jungle; rejects politics, preferring ecology; rejects the law, preferring the primitive situation of indigenous tribes. Cardinal Walter Brandmüller has described the Synod’s working document as “heretical” and “apostate,” and it breaks with the traditional teaching of the Church on non-negotiable points.

A Special Assembly of the Synod of Bishops for the Pan-Amazon Region will be held in Rome from October 6 to 27 to address topics ranging from the model of economic development for the Amazon region to priestly celibacy and ecological and pantheistic proposals, thus increasingly attracting the attention of the public, including non-Catholics.

Official poster promoting the Amazon Synod

Established by Paul VI after the Second Vatican Council, the Synod of Bishops is a permanent consultative institution periodically convened by the Pope to discuss important issues for the Church. It can take three different forms: It is a general synod when dealing with matters of the Universal Church when it gathers representatives of episcopates from all over the world. This general meeting can be ordinary or extraordinary. For example, the Vatican held two synod meetings in October 2015 and October 2016 on the topic of the family, one ordinary and the other extraordinary.

The Pope may also call special assemblies of the Synod of Bishops to deal with matters pertaining to a particular region which in a country (for example, there have been special assemblies on the Netherlands and Lebanon) or in an entire continent (John Paul II convened one for each of the continents in preparation for the Jubilee of the year 2000). It may also concern an entire region, as occurred in 2010 at the Special Assembly for the Middle East, which addressed the tragic situation of Christians in the Holy Land who face extinction. The next Synod has called bishops from nine countries whose dioceses or apostolic administrations are located in the Amazon River basin.

Although it is a special assembly, since its convocation the October Synod has assumed a universal dimension, as its organizers present it as a model for other regions and even the entire world. In this sense, the title of its first preparatory document is eloquent: Amazonia: New Paths for the Church and for an Integral Ecology. The document itself explicitly states this universal character: “The reflections of the Special Synod go beyond the strictly ecclesial scope of the Amazon, because they focus on the universal Church as well as on the future of the whole planet.” The synod is not restricted to preserving the environment in such territories, but should also serve as a universal model of a new society inspired by the indigenous lifestyle, “which breaks with structures that take life and with colonizing mentalities, in order to build networks of solidarity and inter-culturality.” [i]

From the ecclesiastical point of view, the next special assembly will also have a universal character . The Vice President of the German Bishops’ Conference, Archbishop Franz-Josef Bode, expressed the conviction that the Synod for the Pan-Amazonian Region will bring major changes for the universal Church. He hopes that priestly celibacy will be “enriched with other priestly forms of life.” Most Rev. Franz-Josef Overbeck, Bishop of Essen, told the official website of the German Bishops’ Conference that the Synod will lead to a “break” in the Catholic Church. From October onward, “nothing will be as before” on issues such as sexual morality, compulsory celibacy, the role of women in the Church, the hierarchical structure of the Church, and so-called “clericalism.” [ii]

In fact, the organizers and main sponsors of the meeting intend to use it as a platform to launch a syncretistic New Church: a mixture of Christianity and indigenous paganism dedicated to the pantheistic cult of mother earth, the preservation of virgin forests, and the promotion of community tribalism as an alternative to our industrialized consumerist society, which, they allege, harms the environment.

Based on the Synod’s preparatory texts and statements by its organizers and promoters, in this article we will indicate the main areas in which they intend to effect the “break” longed for by Archbishop Overbeck.

Theological Rupture

The most serious intended rupture is the theological one, which starts with the very concept of Revelation. Both the preparatory document sent to the Catholic communities of the Amazon basin and the Instrumentum laboris (working document) prepared from the responses received, promote Indian Theology [iii], which is nothing but a successor of Marxist-inspired Liberation Theology.

Indeed, following the 1984 publication by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith of the Instruction on Some Aspects of Liberation Theology, and as a consequence of the collapse of the Soviet empire, this theological current had to recycle its discourse. But they changed their propaganda without giving up their basic principles. As the ultra-progressive theologian Jose María Vigil stated, “The so-called ‘new emerging subjects’ appeared: the blacks (oppressed race), Indians (oppressed culture) and women (the oppressed sex).” According to him, to these new paradigms should be added eco-theology, since the earth “is also poor, oppressed, mercilessly exploited, in need of freedom from this oppression.” [Iv]

Liberation Theology and its derivatives have a specific immanentist and historicist concept of Revelation. According to Catholic theology, God is a Being transcendent to Creation who man can know by contemplating the natural order, but mainly through supernatural Revelation contained in Holy Scripture and Apostolic Tradition. On the contrary, liberation theologians uphold the immanentist concept that God is not a transcendent Being but a kind of engine or force that propels History toward the fullness of the “Kingdom.” They identify this “Kingdom” with a new society without “alienations,” in which perfect equality and complete freedom prevail.[v]

Rice plantation in Roraima

The nuance that separates old Liberation Theology from the new Indian Theology, explains Father Victor Zaruma, an Ecuadorian theologian of the Cañari ethnicity, is that while the former “has emphasized ‘social class'” and “has concerned itself with the material part of the human being,” Indian Theology “is concerned with the spiritual part of the people.”. [vi] He adds: “The space of struggle is above all culture and religion.” This cultural and religious struggle against the alienation of European “colonialism” rests on the idea that the different religions represent an intimate aspiration of the human being for union with divinity and that the worldview and mythologies of indigenous peoples are “seeds of the Word” that manifest the presence of the Spirit in their history.

Mexican priest Eleazar López, the “midwife” of Indian Theology, explains that “Indian Theology seeks to recover the religious thinking of indigenous peoples before their encounter with Christianity. Indian Theology is the set of religious experiences and knowledge that indigenous peoples have had and with which they explain, from time immemorial to the present day, their experience of faith in the context of their global view of the world and the view that others have of these peoples. Indian Theology is, therefore, a collection of religious practices and popular theological wisdom that members of indigenous peoples use to explain the new and old mysteries of life.” [vii]

In the mold of this completely unorthodox Indian Theology, the Instrumentum laboris of the coming Synod does not base its insights on God’s Revelation, contained in the Bible and Tradition, but on the “oppression” that the Amazon supposedly suffers. From a geographical and cultural area, the Amazon becomes a “privileged interlocutor,” a “theological place,” an “epiphanic place” and “source of God’s revelation.” [viii] He recommends teaching Indian Theology “in all educational institutions” and promoting “a better and greater understanding of indigenous spirituality” and “taking account of original myths, traditions, symbols, rites, and celebrations.” [Ix]

The document repeats its postulates throughout, namely that the “seeds of the Word” are present not only in the ancestral beliefs of aboriginal peoples, but have already “grown and borne fruit” [x]. Instead of its traditional evangelization that seeks to convert them, the Church should limit itself to “dialoguing” with them, since “the active subject of inculturation is the same indigenous peoples.” [xi] In this intercultural dialogue, the Church must also enrich itself with clearly pagan and pantheistic elements of beliefs such s “faith in God the Father-Mother Creator,” “relations with ancestors,” “communion and harmony with the earth” [xii] and connectivity with “the different spiritual forces.” [xiii]

Therefore, the Instrumentum laboris confirms the denunciation made by Cardinal Javier Lozano Barragán, then President of the Pontifical Council for Pastoral Health Care. According to Indian Theology, “in Indian cultures there is a true revelation.” The late Mexican prelate pointed to the grave consequences of this false premise in March 2001 during the 5th Plenary Meeting of the Pontifical Commission for Latin America: “There are two revelations, that of [indigenous] traditions and that of the Bible. First comes the history of indigenous peoples, then the Bible’s, to support it. Indigenous traditions take precedence over the Bible. These traditions are the other Bible, the criterion [of interpretation] of the Christian Bible. Traditions are the other revelation of God. The history of indigenous peoples is their Old Testament… we must read God’s Word from an indigenous context. The Bible is the place where one finds the wisdom of peoples other than the Indians. The result, according to the Mexican cardinal, is that “the Church must recognize that there are various forms of salvation; it must recognize that the path it proposes is only one of many. Christianity must give up its claim to be the only way, without giving up Jesus Christ.” [Xiv]

We can now understand Cardinal Walter Brandmüller’s strong statement on the Austrian news website Kath.net: “It must be said emphatically that the Instrumentum laboris contradicts the binding teaching of the Church on decisive points, so it must be qualified as a heretical document. Since here the reality of Divine Revelation is questioned or misunderstood, one should also speak of apostasy.” [Xv]

Philosophical, Anthropological and Missionary Rupture

One of the authors of the Preparatory Document for the Synod is German priest Paulo Suess, a professor of Missiology at the Nossa Senhora da Assunção College in São Paulo, an adviser to the Indian Missionary Council (CIMI), and a member of the Amazon Synod Preparatory Committee. In his writings, the theologian says that the new missiology rejects the “colonialist” character of the traditional model of evangelization represented, for example, by the magnificent apostolate developed by the Jesuit missionary Saint José de Anchieta. Adhering to the most radical “cultural relativism” for which there is no universal and objective truth, Fr. Suess states that “all peoples and social groups have a historical project of life” codified in their respective culture, which defines their identity and creates a “second [environment]” outside of which “there is no salvation.” Therefore, the missionary’s role with the Indians is reduced to “accompanying the struggle” against the cultural hegemony of colonialist peoples and convincing the aborigines that “the only rupture that the Gospel proposes is a rupture with infidelity to their life project.”

It is therefore not surprising that CIMI still maintains on its website the Yanomami Indians’ defense of infanticide. Under the title “May each People Draw the Threads of Their History,” this defense was presented by anthropologist Rita Laura Segato in the House of Representatives in Brasilia. Based on “legal pluralism” and the pretext that preserving “the right to life of peoples as peoples” (“in the radicality of their difference and the right to build their history”), it has priority over the right to life of individuals. [xvi]

This amounts to enclosing indigenous peoples in their own culture. This attitude, highly prized by postmodern anthropologists, leads to transforming the Amazon into a “human zoo,” as President Jair Bolsonaro has denounced. Above all, it is tantamount to depriving natives of the Catholic Faith, the supernatural means of salvation, and of the universal values ​​and material progress of other cultures, especially Christian culture.

In line with the above, the new missions put aside any idea of evangelization, give Indians only material support, and promote “intercultural dialogue” with them. In an interview with the Spanish portal Religión Digital, Italian missionary Father Corrado Dalmolego [photo], responsible for the Catrimâni Mission, which the Consolata Mission Institute maintains in Yanomami Indian lands, boasted of directing “a mission of presence and dialogue” in which “no one has been baptized in 60 years.” Instead, what is “heart-warming and encouraging” is, according to him, to listen to Yanomami leader David Kopenawa assert that “the Catrimani Mission did things well, it did not harm the Yanomami, did not destroy their culture, did not condemn shamanism.” [xvii]

In this neo-missionary context, the Instrumentum laboris calls for “deepening the ‘process of inculturation’ (Evangelii Gaudium, no. 126) and interculturality (cf. Laudato Si ‘, no. 63, 143 and 146), which demands ‘brave’ proposals from the Church in the Amazon,’” especially since “Evangelization in the Amazon is a set of tests for the Church and society.” [xviii] The “Church with an Amazonian Face,” which must emerge, seeks “rejecting a monocultural, clericalist and colonial tradition that imposes itself, and knowing how to discern and fearlessly embrace the diverse cultural expressions of the peoples,” avoiding to ‘utter a unified message and to put forward a solution which has universal validity’ (cf. Octogesima Adveniens, 4; Evangelii Gaudium, 184).” [xix]

The Instrumentum laboris continues: In the religious field, this requires assuming an attitude of respectful listening that does not impose formulations of faith expressed with other cultural referents that do not respond to their lived reality.[xx] The inculturation of faith is not a top-down process or an external imposition, but a mutual enrichment of cultures in dialogue (interculturality).The active subjects of inculturation are the indigenous peoples themselves.” [xxi] They put away the old catechism and “Start from the spirituality lived by the indigenous peoples in contact with nature and their culture,” assuming the language and meaning of the narratives of the indigenous and Afro-descendant cultures in harmony with the biblical narratives.[xxii]

From Fr. Suess’ words, one deduces that not even this “harmony” with the Bible is very necessary, since “any attempt to replace indigenous religious memory with the memory of Israel would constitute a new attempt at colonization.”  Nor can its history, which is “paradigmatic as a ‘history of salvation,’ replace the history of any people, just as the historical culture of Jesus cannot impose itself as a model culture, prevailing over other cultures.” [xxiii]

In short, “interculturality” results in missionaries renouncing their faith and Christian worship to embrace the superstitions and idolatrous rituals of their dialogue partners. This is what the Spanish Jesuit Father Bartomeu Meliá, head of the Indigenous pastoral ministry of the Paraguayan Bishops’ Conference, openly testified during the 2013 Mission Week: “We asked ourselves: How far can we practice indigenous religions? Almost all religions have two essential elements: listening to the ‘revealed word’ and communing with the community (for indigenous people, dancing and chicha [an alcoholic drink prepared with corn]) … Indigenous religions seem weird to us, but that does not remove the challenge of participating in religious spaces; yes, one can practice indigenous religion without denying one’s own; it even widens our heart.” [xxiv]

From this, one can conclude that Cardinal Walter Brandmüller is not exaggerating when he speaks of “apostasy”…

A Magical-Thaumaturgical Break of a Diabolical Character

The Synod’s Preparatory Document praises not only the spirituality and beliefs of the Amazonian peoples, a source of “good living” and respect for nature, but also their religious leaders: “Wise elders – called interchangeably “payés, mestres, wayanga or chamanes”, among others – promote the harmony of people among themselves and with the cosmos.” [xxv] The Instrumentum laboris points out that, “The richness of the flora and fauna of the rainforest contains veritable “living pharmacopoeias” and unexplored genetic principles,” [xxvi] and that in this context, “indigenous rituals and ceremonies are essential for integral health because they integrate the different cycles of human life and nature.”

The Instrumentum laboris reiterates that these indigenous rituals create harmony and balance between human beings and the cosmos. They protect life from evils that can be caused by both human beings and other living beings.[xxvii] For this reason, it emphasizes “the need to preserve and transmit the knowledge of traditional medicine.[xxviii]

According to anthropologists, these indigenous rituals allow shamans and healers to voluntarily enter altered states of consciousness during which their spirit allegedly travels outside the body, where it can interact with other entities of the supernatural world (which the riverside people call caruanas) to restore balance in a community or in the body of a sick person.

Anthropologist Raymundo H. Maués emphasizes the proximity of these rituals to witchcraft: “Able to cure diseases, the shaman (or healer) is also seen as having the power to cause them. From this fundamental ambiguity certainly arises the suspicion that often falls on him: every shaman is potentially a sorcerer.” [xxix]

Not surprisingly, as early as the seventeenth century the Capuchin French missionary Claude d’Abbeville stressed the likely devilish character of these spirits invoked in healing rituals. He describes healers as “characters whom the devil uses to keep the superstition of the Indians alive.” They “make people believe that it is enough for them to blow upon the sick part to heal it … by sucking it, spitting out the evil and insinuating the cure.” In fact, “they sometimes hide sticks, pieces of iron or bones, and after sucking the sick part they show these objects to the victim pretending to have taken them away. People are often cured, but as an effect of the imagination [modern medicine calls it the placebo effect], superstition, or diabolical crafts.” [xxx]

However, for the German missionary and teacher Father Karl Heinz Arenz SVD, a former student of Father Suess who lives in the Amazon, there is nothing preternatural about these rituals. They are simply a magical manipulation by the shaman of the uninterrupted flow of untamed cosmic forces: “Magic is the basis of the whole shamanic system. It is based on the consistent and organized use of nature’s constant movements for the good of the community. This social function of magic has a profound spiritual connotation by establishing rituals that transcend the natural environment itself, placing it within a ‘horizon of mystery.’” [xxxi]

The German professor sees precisely this social function of restoring the cosmic order within a community as the point of convergence of “pajelança” with Christianity. After insisting that “the term magic cannot be used only in a pejorative or discriminatory sense” because “it aims at restoring the order of creation in the lives of people and groups,” Father Arenz states that “Jesus gratuitously employed common magical gestures and signs of that time, placing them at the service of the Kingdom and thus employing a ‘good magic’ that gives life and meaning (sic).” [xxxii]

Therefore, the Church must “rescue the therapeutic core of the evangelical project” [xxxiii] which has been stifled by “the Church’s insistence on certain concepts of morals and doctrine, especially concerning sin and guilt.” [xxxiv] In particular, it is urgent to recognize the ministry of therapeutic agents, the shamans, as being faithful committed to life who must enjoy a great deal of autonomy: “As shamans, they do not depend on established structures and conventions to legitimize their gift, but only on the ‘mystical companionship’ of their ‘caruanas‘. This fact makes them independent of any institution.” [xxxv]

In other words, for these aggiornati missionaries, the Amazon Church must adopt the appearance of a healer and reform its structures to integrate the shamans with due ministerial autonomy.

Ecclesiological and Sacramental Rupture

BoffAccording to the Preparatory Document and the Instrumentum laboris, recognition of “new ministries” with an “Amazonian face” is indeed one of the Synod’s goals. Much has been said in the press about the proposed priestly ordination of viri probati, married community leaders who would preside over Eucharistic celebrations in remote places where there is no regular Mass. The reform dreamed-up by the neo-missionaries goes much further.In line with Liberation Theology, they claim that the whole community receives the charisms of the Holy Spirit, which gives rise to different ministries, even liturgical ones, to supply its spiritual needs. In turn, the community itself would confer the required powers on the elect. According to Indian Theology, such ministries must be based on tribal structures to be genuine, which is why they must incorporate women. The result of these “new ministries” is the dissolution of the hierarchical character of the Church, based on the sacrament of Holy Orders.

In fact, as the well-known Milanese professor Vincenzo Del Giudice explains, there is a great difference between clergy and laity in the Church. “In it [the Church] there are hierarchical superiors and subjects; there is an active and a passive element [regarding the administration and reception of the sacraments], people who govern (ecclesia dominans) and people who obey (ecclesia obediens), people who teach (ecclesia docens) and others who learn (ecclesia discens). In short, there is an ‘elected’ class (clerus) that has the task of teaching and spiritually governing the faithful and administering the sacraments; and on the other hand, the class of faithful (including laity and clergy), all of whom form the ‘people of God’), who are taught, governed, and led to holiness through the above-explained activity (c. and 948) (Lumen gentium, no. 2829). ” [xxxvi]

From discussions at the Second Vatican Council to the present day, the progressive wing of the Church has developed theories and undertaken many initiatives aimed at blurring this essential difference between clergy and laity. With regard to the celebration of the Eucharist, and anticipating Pope Francis by forty years, Leonardo Boff [pictured above] already wondered in his book, Ecclesiogenesis: The Base Communities Reinvent the Church: “Evidently, every organized community must have its consecrated ministers. But what will a community do which is deprived of the Eucharistic mystery, the sacrament of unity and salvation without any no guilt of its own and for a long time?”

Boff answers: “The base communities show us how the laity can do everything a priest does pastorally. He only cannot consecrate and forgive sins. ‘People ask: why can’t we celebrate the Eucharist?’ (C. Mesters). We know of groups in which the head of the community, by its ad hoc delegation, presides over the Lord’s Supper united with the universal Church.” [xxxvii] He goes on to cite a testimony from the United States published in Concilium magazine. Inevitably, he also calls for women’s ordination in the name of the principle that “the position of women in the Church must accompany the evolution of women in civil society.” [xxxviii]

Taking up the journey Boff began, the Instrumentum laboris advocates that the Synod study the possibility of a priesthood light with the power to celebrate Mass and hear confessions but devoid of any magisterial or pastoral power (which is absolutely contrary to the centuries-old teaching of the Magisterium and is inseparable from the triple priestly, magisterial, and pastoral power which Our Lord Jesus Christ transmitted to the Apostles, who in turn passed it on to their successors through the laying on of hands). Likewise, the pre-synodal document proposes “to identify the type of official ministry that can be conferred on women, taking into account the central role which women play today in the Amazonian Church.” [xxxix] All progressive sectors interpret this as openness to the ordination of women starting with the diaconate, but eventually reaching the priesthood and even the episcopate, as happened in Protestant sects. All this is directly opposed to the immortal teaching and practice of the Church, reiterated by John Paul II in the 1994 Apostolic Letter Ordinatio Sacerdotalis, on the priestly ordination reserved for men only.

But to be authentic, inculturation must also materialize in liturgical celebrations “to be an expression of the religious experience itself and the communion bond of the celebrating community” and “a sounding board for the struggles and aspirations of communities” to have a “land without evil.” [xl] Hence “the need for a process of discernment regarding the celebratory rites, symbols, and styles of indigenous cultures in contact with nature, which must be assumed in the liturgical and sacramental ritual,” hence they specifically ask that the Eucharistic ritual be adapted to their cultures. [xli]

There has been no lack of bold proposals such as that of Jesuit Francisco Saborda. A professor of theology at the Pontifical Catholic University of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and author of several books on the sacraments, he was one of the keynote speakers at the Study Seminar on the Synod held at the Vatican on February 25-27 and attended by Italian Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri, the Vatican authority responsible for the Synod of Bishops. In a side conversation with Crux during the meeting, Father Saborda said that one issue likely to arise during the Synod is the possibility of replacing the bread used in the consecration of the Eucharist with yuca. He claimed that the bread “changes into a pasty porridge during the Amazon rainy season,” which means that “it is not bread, and if it is not bread, it is not the Eucharist.” He added that, while changing the material used in the Eucharist is “a very complex matter,” he believes that local bishops should decide this and that it will probably be mentioned during the October discussion. [xlii]

Regarding this heretical proposal, the Most Rev. Athanasius Schneider, Auxiliary Bishop of Astana, declared that “to celebrate the Eucharist with yuca would mean to introduce a kind of new religion.” [xliii] The undersecretary of the Synod of Bishops, Bishop Fabio Fabene, limited himself to saying that the preparatory documents do not include this proposal and therefore “is not a topic for the next Synod.” [xliv] However, nothing prevents any of the participants from raising the subject during the assembly.

Logotype with telltale headdress topped by a cross…

Civilizational Rupture

At the forthcoming Amazon Synod, they have cast aside the Church’s Social Doctrine under the pretext of the vital importance of fighting against the greenhouse effect and preserving the Amazon rainforest for oxygen production (a thesis not at all confirmed by the best experts in climatology and the environment). In the name of this struggle and of the principle of the universal destination of goods, they propose to violate the natural right of nations to their sovereignty and the natural right of individuals to property, as well as to curtail the widespread diffusion of private property (which guarantees the freedom and autonomy of families vis-à-vis the community).

Contrary to what the Synod’s organizers want, the solution is not to make this immense territory available to a tiny number of indigenous peoples subject to a kind of globalist government that does not respect the principles of subsidiarity or sovereignty of the states whose territory includes part of the Amazon basin. Moreover, the Church’s Social Doctrine does not oppose development but extreme “developmentalism”; however, it does oppose “degrowth,” which is based on a distrust of man that Pope Benedict XVI condemned in his Encyclical Caritas in veritate. History shows that advanced civilizations are born when communities, abandoning nomadic life, come together in stable cities, organize politically under one authority and regulate themselves with public law. The “new civilization” dreamed by the Synod’s organizers under the slogan of the “good living” supposedly practiced by indigenous communities rejects the city preferring the forest, rejects politics preferring ecology, and rejects law, preferring the de facto situation of primitive tribes.[xlv]

From an economic and social point of view, the Instrumentum Laboris is an apology for communism, disguised as “communitarianism,” and for the worst form of communism, which is the collectivism of small communities. Indeed, according to the document, the aboriginal “good living” project (sumak kawsay) assumes that “there is an inter-communication between the whole cosmos, where there is neither excluding nor excluded.” The explanatory note of the indigenous expression refers to a statement by various indigenous entities titled “The cry of sumak kawsay in the Amazon,” which states that this expression “is a most ancient and current Word” [with a capital“ W ”in the text, meaning a divine revelation] which proposes “a community lifestyle with the same FEELING, THINKING, and ACTING” (capitals are from the text).

Plino Correa de OliveiraThis phrase reminds us of the denunciation of indigenous tribalism by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira [photo] in 1976 as an even more radical new stage in the anarchic revolution: “Structuralism sees in tribal life an illusory synthesis between the height of individual freedom and consented collectivism, in which the latter eventually devours freedom. In this collectivism, the various ‘I’s’ or individual persons with their intellect, will, and sensibility, and consequently their characteristic and conflicting ways of being, merge and dissolve into the collective personality of the tribe, which generates an intensely common way of thinking, willing and being.” [xlvi]

A Rupture with a Clearly Pantheistic Flavor

From an ecological point of view, the Instrumentum laboris represents the Church’s acceptance of the divinization of nature promoted by the UN environmental conferences.

Indeed, as early as 1972 in Stockholm, UN official records claimed that man mismanaged natural resources mainly because of a “Judeo-Christian conception” of the world. “Whereas the pantheistic theories … invested living things with an element of divinity … the discoveries of science have led … to a kind of deconsecration of natural beings … These new conceptions find their highest justification in Judeo-Christian religious beliefs, according to which God created man in His own image and gave him the earth to bring under His law.” On the contrary, the UN said, “the practices of ancestor worship formed a bulwark for the environment inasmuch as animals, trees and even watercourses were protected and venerated as the reincarnation of men’s ancestors.” [xlvii]

In the closing speech of the Rio 92 environmental summit in Rio de Janeiro, UN Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali stated that “To the ancients, the Nile was a god to be venerated, as was the Rhine, an infinite source of European myths, or the Amazonian forest, the mother of forests.  Throughout the world, nature was the abode of the divinities that gave the forest, the desert, or the mountains a personality which commanded worship and respect.  The Earth had a soul. To find that soul again, to give it new life, that is the essence of Rio [‘s Intergovernmental Conference].” [xlviii]

With a very similar language, the Instrumentum laboris, citing a Bolivian document, states that “The jungle is not a resource to exploit, it is a being or various beings with whom to relate” [xlix] and goes on to state that “the life of Amazon communities not yet influenced by Western civilization [sic!] is reflected in the beliefs and rites regarding the actions of spirits, of the many-named divinity acting with and in the territory, with and in relation to nature. This worldview is captured in the ‘mantra’ of Francis: ‘everything is connected’.” [l]

Here we have the United Nations’ neo-pagan agenda summarized by the basic document of a Synod of the Catholic Church! In light of this we must conclude with the words of Cardinal Walter Brandmüller in his closing statement: “The Instrumentum laboris for the Amazon Synod constitutes an attack on the foundations of the Faith, and in a way that has not heretofore been thought possible. Thus it must be rejected with all decisiveness.”

Source: Catolicismo magazine, Nº 824, August 2019.

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One thought on “The Synod of Great Ruptures

  1. Esse sínodo será um absurdo! Nós verdadeiros católicos jamais vamos admitir isso! Deixo aqui o meu protesto!

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