Share on facebook
Share on pinterest
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

Languages

LOGOTIPO8
Share on facebook
Share on pinterest
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

Languages

LOGOTIPO8

The Left, CIMI and the Amazon Synod Loathe My Christian-Born Brazil

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on whatsapp
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on email
Share on print

The Birth of Christian Brazil, Rejected by the Left

Mártires do Brasil BEATO INACIO DE AZEVEDO E 40 COMPANHEIROS 1

Eighty years ago on July 16, 1939, Feast of the Blessed Forty Brazilian martyrs, this is how the Legionário commented on the apostolate of Father Ignacio de Azevedo (July 15, 1570), recruiting missionaries to nascent Brazil: “He led the largest missionary expedition drawn from Europe in those times to increase the conquering clergy of Christ the King in the lands beyond the sea. Their superior was Father Ignacio de Azevedo, former Visitor who had returned from Brazil to solve the pressing problem of vocations, and now Provincial. He brought seventy young religious and many candidates, still secular, to be admitted to our homeland.”[1]

* * *

The Amazon Synod and its doctrines oppose the missionaries, Father Anchieta, Father Nóbrega, Ignacio de Azevedo, and the martyred 39 companions

Coming up very soon is the Amazon Synod – whose exponents spread a doctrine diametrically opposed to that upheld by the great missionaries who spent their lives here to convert, elevate and civilize our Indians.

Praia do Chapadão

Below we transcribe from the work The Crusader of the 20th Century important considerations of the renowned Italian historian, Professor Roberto de Mattei, on Brazil, its history and potential for the future of the world.

      “Visiting Brazil in the 1930s, Stefan Zweig was amazed by this land that he foresaw would “play one of the most important roles in the future development of our world”.[2]

A European Writes about the Grandeur of Brazil

What first impresses one about Brazil is the enormous size of its surfaces and its horizons.  This country, with its 8,511,965 square kilometers, covers over half of the total area of South America.  The great mountains that descend precipitously to the sea, the forests of lush vegetation, the tumultuous Amazon river, which with its basin of over five million square kilometers is the most extensive fluvial system in the world, give the image of a country where everything is present in super-abundance: nature, light, colors, so much so as to make one think, according to the image of Rocha Pita, of a real “terrestrial paradise”.

First Gesture: Raising the Cross and Celebrating Mass

Brazil’s date of birth was 22 April 1500, when on the horizon of the new land there appeared the white sails of the Portuguese fleet, commanded by Pedro Alvares Cabral.  The first gesture of the descobridores (discoverers) was to erect a Cross on the beach and to celebrate on the new land the unbloody sacrifice of Calvary.  From then on Brazil became the “Terra da Santa Cruz”.

The Jesuits were the seed: quite the opposite of current CIMI doctrine, which does not aim at converting and civilizing the Indians

Museu Nacional de Belas Artes

The Cross, recalls Father Leite, “was a symbol and a promise. But not yet a seed.  This was to come, prolifically and abundantly, almost a half century later, in 1549, with the establishment of a General Government and the arrival of the Jesuits”.

Catechizing, civilizing and elevating the Indians morally and materially: quite the opposite of what the Amazon Synod is planning.

“The Jesuits infused a soul into what up to then had been a land rich in potential, but shapeless. “The land is our task”[9] declared Father Manuel da Nóbrega[10] who, with Father José de Anchieta,[11] may be considered the founder of Brazil.  From the Descobrimento (Discovery) to our times, the missionaries carried out a “task, unparalleled in history”,[12] of Christianizing and, at the same time, of civilizing the lands of Brazil.  The Jesuits catechized the natives, gathering them into special villages (Aldeias), they opened the first schools, they built colleges, churches, roads and cities.[13] When the Huguenots tried to take over the new land, Fathers Nobrega and Anchieta were the overseers (orientadores) of the military operations against the French Protestants who had disembarked in the Bay of Guanabara.[14]

Manifestação antipt

One day, Brazil will be a great country!

  • [1] https://www.pliniocorreadeoliveira.ifo/LEG_390716_40martires_do_Brasil.htm#.XS5Tv-hKguU
  •  
  • [2] Stefan Zweig, Brazil.  Land of the future, (London, Cassell, 1942), p. 2;  cf. also Ernani Silva Bruno, Historia e Tradições da Cidade de São Paulo, 3 vols., Rio de Janeiro, Livraria José Olympio Editora, 1954;  Affonso A. de Freitas, Tradições e reminiscências paulistanas, 3rd edn., Governo do Estado de São Paulo, São Paulo 1978;  Luiz Gonzaga Cabral S.J., Influência dos Jesuitas na colonização do Brasil, in Jesuitas no Brasil, (São Paulo, Companhia Melhoramentos de S.  Paulo, 1925), vol. III.
  •  
  • [3] “Brazil was born Christian.  Its first historian, who was also one of its discoverers, called it the Island of the True Cross”.  Padre Serafim Leite S.J, Páginas de História do Brasil, (São Paulo, Companhia Editora Nacional, 1937), p. 11.  The chronicler of the expedition, Pedro Vaz de Caminha, wrote to the king: “We cannot tell if there is gold, silver, metals or iron; we have seen none of them.  But the land itself is rich (….) However the best fruit that can be drawn from it, in our opinion, is to bring to its inhabitants the salvation of their souls.” in Roger Bastide, Brasil terra de Contrastes, It. tr., Il Brasile, (Milan, Garzanti, 1964), p. 13;  text of the letter of Pero Vaz e Caminho in Jaime Cortesão, A expedição de Pedro Alvares Cabral, (Lisbôa , Livrarias Ailland e Bertrand, 1922), pp. 233-56.
  •  
  • [4] Yves de la Brière, Le règne de Dieu sous la Croix du Sud, (Bruges-Paris, Desclée de Brouwer & C., 1929), p. 20.
  •  
  • [5] Roberto Cantalupo, Brasile euro-americano, (Milan, Istituto per gli Studi di Politica Internazionale, 1941), p. 89.
  •  
  • [6] S.  Leite S.J., Páginas de História do Brasil, pp. 12-13.  “Without ignoring the part others had to play, one can, without fear, make this exact statement: the history of the Jesuits in Brazil in the sixteenth century is the history of the formation of Brazil itself as regards its catechetical, moral, spiritual, educational formation and, in great part, its colonial formation as well.  The contribution of other religious factors does not significantly modify these results” (p. 14).
  •  
  • [7] The Regimento of 17 December 1548 in which the King John III of Portugal outlined to his governor Tomé de Souza the rules of government which he should adhere to in Brazil, stated: “The main reason that drove me to send people to populate the aforesaid lands of Brazil was that the people of that country should convert to our holy Catholic faith”Regimento de Tomé de Souza, Biblioteca Nacional de Lisbôa, Arquivo da Marinha, liv.  1 de ofícios, de 1597 a 1602.  Cf. also Padre Armando Cardoso S.J., “O ano de 1549 na historia do Brasil e da Companhia de Jesus”, Verbum, no. 6, 1949, pp. 368-92.
  •  
  • [8] S. Zweig, Brazil, p. 38.  Cf. Carlos Sodré Lanna, “Gênese da civilização cristã no Brasil”, Catolicismo, no. 519, March 1994, pp. 23-4;  Idem, “A epopéia missionária na formação da Cristandade luso-brasileira, Catolicismo, no. 533, May 1995, pp. 22-3.
  •  
  • [9] in Antonio de Queiroz Filho, A vida heróica de José de Anchieta, (São Paulo, Edições Loyola, 1988), p. 43.
  •  
  • [10] Father Manuel da Nóbrega was born in Entre-Douro-e-Minho in Portugal on 18 October 1517 and died in Rio de Janeiro on 18 October 1570.  Doctor in Canon Law and Philosophy in Coimbra, in 1544 he entered the Society of Jesus and in 1549 he was sent by St Ignatius to Brazil, where he was the first superior of the Jesuit mission and then Provincial.  His mission developed for over twenty years, up to his death.
  •  
  • [11] Born on 19 March 1534 in La Laguna (Canaries), Blessed José de Anchieta died in Reritiba (now Anchieta) on 9 June 1597.  In 1551 he entered the Society of Jesus and two years later embarked for Brazil with a group of missionaries who followed the Portuguese governor Duarte da Costa.  Ordained to the priesthood in 1566, he participated in the Foundation of São Paulo (1554) and of Rio de Janeiro (1565) and in 1578 became Provincial of Brazil, while carrying out a tireless apostolate that earned him the title of “Apóstolo do novo Mundo”.  He was beatified by John Paul II in 1980.  Cf. Alvares do Amaral, O Padre José Anchieta e a fundação de São Paulo, São Paulo, Conselho Estadual de Cultura, 1971.
  •  
  • [12] S. Leite S.J., História da Companhia de Jesus no Brasil, (Lisboa , Livraria Portugal, 1938), vol. I.
  •  
  • [13] Alongside the Jesuits, the Benedictines (from 1582), the Carmelites (from 1584), the Capuchins (from 1612) and other religious orders carried out their apostolate.  The Jesuits, expelled in 1760 by the Marquis of Pombal, returned to Brazil in 1842.  On the 40 Jesuit martyrs of 1570,  cf. Mauricio Gomes dos Santos S.J., Beatos Inacio de Azevedo e 39 companheiros martires, Didaskalia, no. 8, 1978, pp. 89-155;  pp. 331-66 (translation of the study made for the historical office of the Congregation of Saints).
  •  
  • [14] Giuseppe Adorno was counsellor to Fathers Nobrega and Anchieta.  He was an Italian aristocrat of the family of the Genoese Doges, who had put his fortune and his life at the service of the new Lusitanian country, after having been forced to abandon his city.  As well as the Adorno family, the Acciaiuoli (Accioly), Doria, Fregoso, Cavalcanti (Cavalcanti d’Albuquerque) families all transferred to Brazil in the sixteenth century. 
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on whatsapp
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on email
Share on print

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Enter Captcha Here : *

Reload Image